Munich: The Edge of War Review


Director Christian Schwochow created Munich: The Edge of War to be a puzzle of deceit, and he succeeded—in spades. The film is based on actual events preceding World War II, and it is politically enticing and spellbinding.

In 1917 (2019), a British war film set during World War I, actor George Mackay played the role of a soldier who faced serious peril while delivering a critical message. In Munich: The Edge of War, Mackay plays British diplomat Hugh Legat, who is assigned to Munich and must get a message out in an effort to prevent Adolph Hitler, played by Ulrich Matthes, from starting World War II. Jeremy Irons plays
British Prime Minister Neville Chamberlain, who desperately wants to avoid war. The plot thickens when Legat meets old friend Paul Von Hartman, played by Jannis Niewohner, who works for the German government. Though on opposite sides, they come together to figure out what is best for both of their countries. But there are spies everywhere and danger lurks around every corner.

Munich: The Edge of War had my head spinning with its puzzles of lies and misinformation. And my understanding is that it is a realistic depiction of the situation before the start of World War II. The espionage focus of Munich: The Edge of War is simply top-notch.

I found Munich: The Edge of War to be one of the best true story thrillers of World War II that I’ve seen for a long time. It was a thrilling and sometimes astonishing experience. George Mackay may have delivered his best performance since 1917, and Jeremy Irons was brilliant as Neville Chamberlain. Munich: The Edge of War is worth the time to watch on the big screen, and it should be a big hit when it opens on Netflix on January 21. Three and a half stars for Munich: The Edge of War.

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