Bullet Train Review


What country has almost two thousand miles of very high speed “bullet” trains? Japan. What happens to a bullet train if anything goes wrong at those speeds? The passengers—and the main characters in the film Bullet Train—are of course in very serious risk of harm. What actor can deliver a dark humor with laughs and deceit that can stand up to these extreme risks? The one and only Brad Pitt.

In Bullet Train, a film directed by David Leitch, Pitt is Ladybug, a man who does dirty work for high pay. He is assigned to retrieve a briefcase on a train, but there are others aboard the train who have the same goal. There are two agents, Tangerine and Lemon, played by Aaron Taylor-Johnson and Brian Tyree Henry. There is Prince, played by Joey King. And there is Kimura, played by Andrew Koji. All have one element in common—they are all assassins. Ladybug realizes that the other operatives aboard the train will make his mission more difficult, and that there are many dangers associated with the mission.

With Bullet Train, Leitch uses violence, conflict, and characterizations for numerous surprises. With Pitt as the lead character, there is no question that it will be a ride of high-octane fun. Pitt’s down-to-earth attitude and method style acting is a perfect fit for this film. His character here is reminiscent of his role in Mr. and Mrs. Smith(2005) blended with Fight Club (1999).

The character development in Bullet Train is superb. There are tons of satirical conversations between Ladybug and Tangerine, and Ladybug and Lemon. All of the main characters are criminal pros, and as the tension grows they think back on their background and to funny conversations with clever metaphors and references. Be ready to hear a generous amount of references to Thomas the Train. One character repeatedly refers to it as his way of coping with stressful situations, and the references are always hysterical.

Bullet Train is flat out fun with many tangents, and it’s unforgettable. There are many blindsiding scenarios where the film becomes a ride of laughs, action, and non-stop brilliance from the mind of director David Leitch. It is an action hijacking film on acid, a warp-speed of brilliance and engrossing suspense. I did not want the train to stop. With Brad Pitt in fight mode there is always an extra hit of something, an iron fist, sarcasm, misdirection, or a combination of the above. See Pitt in his epic performance on a very fast train. Four stars for Bullet Train.

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