“Boyhood” Review by Tarek Fayoumi


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One day in the city of downtown Chicago, I saw Richard Linklater’s most talked about movie “Boyhood.” I was in amazement with how elegant it was. Linklater brings a heartfelt film with actors that have been in the works of this production for the last twelve years. We see a few big name celebrities, but the audience is introduced to new celebrities as well. It stars Ellar Coltrane (as Mason), Lorelei Linklater (as Samantha), Patricia Arquette (as Mom), and Ethan Hawke (as Dad). Even though, we are still months away from nominees of movies, “Boyhood” is already receiving a ton of Oscar buzz.

 

“Boyhood” was filmed in twelve years with the same cast. The film is an innovative adventure through the eyes of a child named Mason. Mason grows up before we know it. His mom and dad have relationship problems and are divorced. Mason’s sister is Samantha. “Boyhood” establishes the life of childhood unlike any other childhood film.

 

“Boyhood” is technologically great with being chronological. The editor Sandra Adair (did editing for a variety of Linklater’s films including “School of Rock,” “Before Sunrise,” “Before Sunset,” “Before Midnight,” “Suburbia,” and more) does a tremendous job with snapshots of adolescence with road trips, family dinners, birthdays, and graduation of high school. The best part of this is that all of the moments in between become transcendent and set to a soundtrack spanning the years from Coldplay’s Yellow to Arcade Fire’s Deep Blue. “Boyhood” is an artsy masterpiece that is both a sentimental time capsule of the recent past and an ode to growing up and parenting.

 

The film is two hours and fifteen minutes, quite long for a childhood drama. When “Boyhood” is experienced though, it does not feel that long at all. However, the challenges that Mason faces were not always understood at first. At like three instances, it was unexplained with why Mason would be angry.

 

Despite the moments of unexplained scenes, “Boyhood” is spectacle, involving, and charming—and one that is a must-see.

 

Four stars.

 

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